BLM Co-Founder Alicia Garza Reflects on Three Years of the Movement

FEATURING ALICIA GARZA - It was in July 2013 that three African American women, Patrisse Cullors, Opal Tometi, and Alicia Garza, who were prominent activists in their communities, joined together and coined the simple yet powerful refrain, "Black Lives Matter." It happened in response to in the acquittal of George Zimmerman for the killing of Trayvon Martin. A year later, an uprising in Ferguson, Missouri over the police killing of Michael Brown, catapulted the phrase and the activists empowered by it, into a movement. The three women co-founders of BLM have received accolades, been interviewed in major media outlets, invited to give speeches, and much more. But throughout it all, they have stuck to their principles, and inspired a new generation of activists. Alicia Garza, special-projects director in the Oakland office of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, she serves on the Board of Directors for the School of Unity and

Conversation With Black Lives Matter Co-Founder Alicia Garza on 3rd Anniversary of the Movement – EXTENDED INTERVIEW

FEATURING ALICIA GARZA - It was in July 2013 that three African American women, Patrisse Cullors, Opal Tometi, and Alicia Garza, who were prominent activists in their communities, joined together and coined the simple yet powerful refrain, "Black Lives Matter." It happened in response to in the acquittal of George Zimmerman for the killing of Trayvon Martin. A year later, an uprising in Ferguson, Missouri over the police killing of Michael Brown, catapulted the phrase and the activists empowered by it, into a movement. The three women co-founders of BLM have received accolades, been interviewed in major media outlets, invited to give speeches, and much more. But throughout it all, they have stuck to their principles, and inspired a new generation of activists. NOTE: Watch the Extended version of this interview, available only to our subscribers, or to rent or buy. Alicia Garza, special-projects director in the Oakland office of the

Will Clinton’s College Debt Relief Plan Help Rich Get Richer?

FEATURING ISAIAH POOLE - Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton unveiled a major plan on Tuesday focused on "technology and innovation," the two buzzwords favored most by the corporate world. Her plan includes a college debt relief program, greater investment in startup companies, and computer science teacher training. But Clinton's plan is already coming under attack for being too focused on a sector of society that needs far less help than low-income communities and other industries. According to my guest Isaiah Poole, "Clinton may not have done this intentionally, but she has offered a proposal that fits neatly into the 'makers vs. takers' right-wing narrative of the economy, one that exalts the so-called 'job creators' but offers little if anything to the people doing those jobs." Find more at www.ourfuture.org. Isaiah Poole, editor of OurFuture.org, formerly with the Congressional Quarterly. He is a founding member of the Washington Association of Black Journalists and

Following Brexit Vote, Chaos Reigns In Gov’t, Pound Declines

FEATURING LIAM O'HARE - In the on-going political chaos after Britain's vote to leave the European Union, Conservative leader Boris Johnson made his splash. Mr. Johnson, who was expected to vie for the Prime Minister-ship announced that he would not indeed be in the running to replace David Cameron. Meanwhile fears over a rapid economic decline in the wake of a Brexit vote seem to be coming to pass. Worse still, hate crimes against Muslims and Polish residents have skyrocketed. Liam O'Hare, Journalist with RT, covering UK politics and issues of asylum and migration.

Suicide Attack On Istanbul Airport Is Latest In String of Deadly Blasts

FEATURING KANI XULAM - Forty-one people are estimated to have been killed in a major suicide bombing of Istanbul's Ataturk Airport on Tuesday. The attack in Turkey's capital left nearly 150 people injured. News reports are claming that there were three perpetrators, two inside the airport and one in the parking lot, all wearing suicide vests. There were also reports of gunfire. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan wasted no time in declaring that Turkey will respond harshly to the attack. As of this recording it is unclear who is responsible for the suicide bombings but many are predictably speculating a connection with the Islamic State. Find more at www.kurdistan.org. Kani Xulam, Director of the American Kurdish Information Network.

How To Make White People Laugh

FEATURING NEGIN FARSAD - Donald Trump has emboldened untold numbers of anti-Muslim Americans by declaring his proposed ban on Muslims as part of his bizarre presidential campaign. It's hard to take Trump seriously, except that enough Americans do take him seriously. Today, we intend on making light of Trump and his ilk with my guest Negin Farsad who has used the reactionary fear of Muslims in the US as a central trope in her comedy. Farsad has co-directed and produced a documentary called The Muslims Are Coming, which is when I first met her. Farsad now has a new book out - an autobiography of sorts that happens to be incredibly hilarious. It's called How to Make White People Laugh. Negin Farsad, Iranian American Muslim comedian, Ted Senior Fellow, director and producer of The Muslims are Coming, author of the new book, 'How To Make White People Laugh'.

Could the Senate Undermine Vermont’s GMO Labeling Law?

FEATURING REBECCA SPECTOR - On July 1st, Vermont will become the first state in the nation to require labeling of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) on foods being sold to the public. For years consumers groups have tried, and failed, to require labeling in states around the country, and food industry lobbyists have spent millions of dollars fighting such initiatives. In Vermont, democracy finally prevailed on this issue. But now the US Senate, in what many are calling a "poorly drafted bill," is attempting to undo the Vermont labeling law and others like it. Find more at www.centerforfoodsafety.org. . Rebecca Spector, West Coast Director at the Center for Food Safety.

Huge Victory for Reproductive Health At Supreme Court

FEATURING RUPALI SHARMA - Reproductive rights advocates have not been used to scoring victories for a very long time. That is why Monday's Supreme Court decision to void one of the most restrictive anti-abortion laws in the nation in Texas, came as such a surprise. The court, in a 5-3 vote, with Justice Anthony Kennedy as the swing vote, struck down Texas' onerous requirement for doctors performing abortions at clinics to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. "Nearby" in this context meant within 30 miles. The cleverly written state law was cast as one that was meant to protect women but that effectively shuttered a majority of the state's abortion providers. The repercussions of this ruling are very significant. Within a day, three other states with similar laws were struck down - Alabama, Mississippi and Wisconsin. The ruling is considered the most important to emanate from the Supreme Court in

Supreme Court Hands Small But Significant Victory For Gun Control

FEATURING RON LEGRAND - The US Supreme Court issued yet another ruling this week, preserving a ban on gun ownership for those convicted of domestic violence. The case was brought by two men, Stephen Voisine and William Armstrong in Maine, who felt they should not be subjected to the existing federal gun ban because their domestic violence convictions were a result of recklessness, not intentional. Studies have shown that people who are abused by their spouses are five times more likely to be murdered when there is a gun present. Find more at www.nnedv.org. Ron LeGrand, Vice President of Public Policy at the National Network to End Domestic Violence.

BLM Activist Jasmine Richards is Free, Vows to Fight On

FEATURING JASMINE RICHARDS - Prominent Black Lives Matter activist Jasmine Richards has been freed from Los Angeles County Jail after serving 15 days out of her 90-day sentence. She became the first black woman to be convicted of a felony charge that was only until recently known as "lynching." The 28-year old founder of the Pasadena chapter of Black Lives Matter in Southern California, has inspired her local community of low-income black youth, especially in Northwest Pasadena where she grew up and now organizes. Richards, who has adopted the last name Abdullah after her mentor Cal State LA professor Melina Abdullah, became politically active after the Pasadena police killing of a young black man in her community called Kendrec McDade. While there was an internal investigation of McDade's killing, to date, no one at the Pasadena police department has been held accountable. I've been following the story of Jasmine Richards