Black Lives Matter Toronto Camp Outside Police HQ

FEATURING ALEXANDRIA WILLIAMS - The spirit of Black Lives Matter is alive and well - north of our border. In an amazing show of strength and activism, a number of activists from Black Lives Matter Toronto have been camping outside their police headquarters to protest among other things, the police killings of a 45-year old South Sudanese man named Andrew Loku, and a 21-year old man named Alex Wettlaufer. On Saturday, BLM activists declared a Black Out day of action and surrounded the Toronto police headquarters. The group has also released a mixtape of music by local artists. Follow BLM-TO on Twitter @BLM_TO. Alexandria Williams, Black Lives Matter-Toronto.

‘Right Wing Extremists’ Dehumanize Transgender People Through “Bathroom Bills”

FEATURING MARA KEISLING - The state of Kansas has become the latest flashpoint in the battle over bathroom rights nationwide. A bill being considered by the state legislature would require that people could only use restrooms in public schools and universities that aligned with their biological sex at birth. Furthermore, if students caught a transgender person in a prohibited bathroom they could sue their school for $2,500. Advocates for transgender rights are calling it a "bounty to hunt for transpeople in bathrooms." Earlier we covered a broad-ranging bill in North Carolina that was passed and signed into law. It appears as though conservatives around the country are using a state-by-state approach to chip away at the rights of people, much in the way they have done for other issues such as gay marriage and abortion. Find out more at www.transequality.org. Mara Keisling, Executive Director of the National Center for Transgender Equality.

American By Paper: How Documents Matter in Immigrant Literacy

FEATURING KATE VIEIRA - Undocumented immigrants that come to the US looking for a better life face myriad challenges. One of the most difficult is having to find ways to bypass the numerous documents and papers that citizens and legal residents take for granted. Whether it's needing a drivers license to drive a car or a social security card to work, undocumented immigrants face a daunting maze of legal paperwork. Kate Vieira, Assistant professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, author of American By Paper: How Documents Matter in Immigrant Literacy.

Mara Keisling on Anti-Transgender Bills – EXTENDED INTERVIEW

FEATURING MARA KEISLING - The state of Kansas has become the latest flashpoint in the battle over bathroom rights nationwide. A bill being considered by the state legislature would require that people could only use restrooms in public schools and universities that aligned with their biological sex at birth. Furthermore, if students caught a transgender person in a prohibited bathroom they could sue their school for $2,500. Advocates for transgender rights are calling it a "bounty to hunt for transpeople in bathrooms." Earlier we covered a broad-ranging bill in North Carolina that was passed and signed into law. It appears as though conservatives around the country are using a state-by-state approach to chip away at the rights of people, much in the way they have done for other issues such as gay marriage and abortion. Find out more at www.transequality.org. NOTE: Watch the Extended version of this interview, available only to our

Drinking While Black? Two Lawyers Kicked Out Of Fresno Bar

FEATURING ABRE' CONNER - Despite pronunciations that we live in a post-racial society, African Americans in particular know that even when doing the most mundane tasks they are likely to be racially profiled while in public. Black folk are followed by store clerks while shopping, or even arrested for no reason. Last year a black women's book club was kicked off a Napa wine train for apparently laughing too loud. And, most recently, two black women were kicked out of a karaoke bar in Fresno, California for reasons that seem to point to only one thing: the fact that they were the only two black women there. What the bar staff did not know is that the two women were imminently aware more so than the average person of what their rights are - they were attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California. One of those women

Mumia Abu Jamal on Nixon’s War on Drugs

FEATURING MUMIA ABU JAMAL - Mumia just filed this report about John Ehrlichman - President Nixon's close advisor - about comments he made on the "war on drugs." Listen his commentaries at www.prisonradio.org. Mumia Abu Jamal, award winning journalist and political prisoner.

Cal State University Employees Prepare for a Historic Walkout

FEATURING ANTONIO GALLO - Tens of thousands of faculty and staff at 23 California State Universities across the nation's most populous state may be getting ready to go on a 5-day strike in mid-April. The impending CSU strike - if it happens - would be the largest strike of university employees in the nation and could impact schools that serve nearly half a million students. An independent report released this Monday ruled in favor of staff demands for a 5% pay hike, saying the state school system can afford it. The CSU system has so far refused, offering instead a 2% increase. Talks have stalled since the summer. Antonio Gallo, Adjunct Professor of Chicano(a) Studies at Cal State Northridge, and Co-Chair of Faculty Rights at the California Faculty Association, CSUN.

California Battles Over Raising Minimum Wage

FEATURING PAUL SONN - Unions and other groups celebrated a major victory in recent days when one of two measures to raise California's minimum wage to $15 an hour made it onto November's statewide ballot. But, over the weekend, Gov. Jerry Brown reached a deal with unions to gradually increase the state's minimum wage from its current $10 an hour to $15 over several years. The ballot measure, if it passed, would have been a quicker increase to $15. Polls indicate that such a measure would have likely passed. For more information, visit www.nelp.org and raisethemininumwage.com. Paul Sonn, General Counsel and Program Director at the National Employment Law Project.

Women Lead The Fight Against Climate Change

FEATURING ANTONIA JUHASZ - As scientists continue to warn us about the warning signs of global warming all around us, activism against climate change keeps ramping up. What's remarkable is that the fight for climate justice is led by many women, even as the decision making on energy policy is male dominated. Writing an article in the latest issue of Ms. Magazine about women and climate change called "Saving Mother Earth" is Antonia Juhasz. Read more of Antonia's work at www.antoniajuhasz.net and follow her on Twitter @antoniajuhasz. Antonia Juhasz, is a leading energy analyst, author, and investigative journalist specializing in oil. An award-winning writer, her articles appear in Newsweek, Rolling Stone, Harper's Magazine, The Atlantic, CNN.com, The Nation, Ms., The Advocate, and more. Juhasz is the author of three books: Black Tide (2011), The Tyranny of Oil (2008), and The Bush Agenda (2006).

Sanders Sweeps Three States, Gaining Momentum As He Heads West

FEATURING MARY BOTTARI - Bernie Sanders's presidential campaign gained much-needed momentum over the weekend when he won landslide victories in in three state primaries - Washington, Alaska, and Hawaii. Each win was by more than 70% of the vote. Sanders, who had been struggling to catch up to his rival Hillary Clinton after her sweeping wins in Southern states, said at a rally in Wisconsin, "We knew things were going to improve as we headed West." Read Mary Bottari's article HERE. Mary Bottari is the Director of the Center for Media and Democracy's Real Economy Project and editor of their www.BanksterUSA.org site. She just wrote an article on PRWatch entitled, Easter Rebellion: Three States Give Bernie Sanders Landslide Victories.